Friday, January 19, 2018

In Venezuela, money has stopped working


Fernando,
I saw this article today, and it really made an impact on me regarding the hyperinflation occurring in Venezuela.
- How 20-bolivar bills are left behind by looters because they are worthless.
- How the official exchange rate has nothing to do with real world costs.
- That prices are roughly doubling every month, and wages can't keep up.
- that, "Tuna holds its value. Money doesn’t."
I remember the school lessons on the crash of the Deutschmark after W.W. II, but this is much more real because it is happening now. In the aftermath of war, there is reconstruction; what can be done about the devastation caused by governmental corruption and mismanagement on a massive scale? This is tragic.
Best regards,
Deen
.
Hello Deen,
The situation in Venezuela is just terrible.
Very similar to Weimar Republic or Zimbabwe where paper currency pretty much lost all its value and you needed carts full of the stuff to buy a loaf of bread.
I can sure relate to the value of a can of tuna. In countries like Venezuela, and even in Argentina during the worst period after 2001, a can of tuna is something pretty special.
No, hold on, don’t laugh! ;-)
You have to go through it to understand it. Do you have any idea what it means to buy something that you know will go up in price %500 or more before it expires?
That little can of tuna is practically magic.
It’s meat you can store meat without refrigeration. Something very important with rolling blackouts.
It lasts for years.
It’s precious meat protein.
It goes very well along with most other staples like rice or pasta.
It may not be available next time you’re at the grocery store…
You end up treasuring those things. Believe me.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

What's the Best Gun for Home Defense?


Monday, January 15, 2018

Leatherman Rebar: A Hard-Use Classic with Great Tools


The Leatherman Rebar is a classic, hard use multi-tool.

You don’t have a pocket clip or one-hand open for the blade like in the Leatherman Charge Tti or Leatherman Wave, but you get a better set of screwdrivers with longer shafts, better plier with 154CM removable wire cutters and an all around solid multi-tool.

The saw in the Rebar went through this 2 inch dry hardwood without a problem.

The Leatherman Rebar is intended to be carried either in the sheath provided on your belt, maybe in a pack or kit. I see it well suited for outdoors use or for construction or DIY projects, would do nicely in a BOB or other kits.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Experts are predicting the worst flu season in history


So many medical experts are predicting that this season’s flu will be the worst in history.
This is because the main flu strain for 2017-18, known as the H3N2 virus, is more deadly than the swine flu of 2009. To make things even more complicated, traditional flu vaccine is not very effective because of the virus mutation.

All this taken into consideration, its better to remember some effective, common sense advice from the CDC for dealing with flu.

1)Avoid catching flu in the first place by avoiding crowds and keeping your distance from people as much as you can. Careful with touching surfaces in public places, offices, schools, etc.
2)Avoid touching your nose, eyes and mouth.
3)Wash your hands often, especially before eating. My wife and I (and our kids) we keep  alcohol-based hand sanitizer handy.
4)If you’re sick, stay home so as to avoid spreading the disease to others.
5)Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing
Also, even if not very effective for this season’s flu, consider getting flu shots, especially if you are in a High Risk Group:
Children younger than 5, but especially children younger than 2 years old
Adults 65 years of age and older
Pregnant women (and women up to two weeks postpartum)
Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
American Indians and Alaskan Natives

People who have medical conditions including asthma, neurological and neurodevelopmental, chronic lung disease, heart disease, weakened immune system due to disease or medication (such as people with HIV or AIDS, or cancer, or those on chronic steroids). Check the link from the CDC for more information.
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Rodney King Riots After Action Repot




Fer Fal could you critique this guy's actions? I think it would be better to stay inside the theater.
-Tom
.
Hi Tom, sure thing.
Long story short, the link above is about a guy’s experience during the Rodney King Riots of 1992 in LA. The author called Robert, wife Karen and their children are in a theater in a Hollywood premiere when the riots start outside on the street on April 29. The security guard in the theater locks the doors, kills the lights so that rioters cant see inside an eventually Robert, Karen and the kids go to the underground parking, get in their car and drive home.
In a nutshell, that’s the story.

As for lessons learned, first we must understand we’re talking about a self-confessed “Hollywood liberal” movie screenwriter and the entire story reeks of such mentality, very different from a prepper or survivalist.

His wife clearly wears the pants and Robert sounds like the typical liberal beta male. His wife is the hero of the story at one point because she’s the one with a flashlight in her purse…
When rioters start throwing stones at the building, his wife Karen doesn’t even flinch. Robert believes his wife’s face has the determined expression of a “seventeenth-century general” with nerves of steel. In reality what he’s describing is anything but and is in fact resignation and being frozen by fear. This is not to be confused with determination, but it’s a very typical reaction among those that aren’t prepared and simply “cant believe this is happening”. Its basically good old denial. 

Lessons learned? Well, getting caught in Sunset Boulevard the day of the verdict would be a big one. You need to be aware of the world around you, of what’s going through those “inner city youths” mind. If they had done that they would have realized that specific day could get complicated fast and they would have let this socializing event pass.
Of course not even having a flashlight (or a CCW which the author later regrets) that’s another big fail. You need to have a few basic EDC tools with you and a flashlight is one you should never be without.

Now maybe the biggest questions is, should they have bugged in and waited inside the theatre or did they do well in going to the parking, getting into their car and escaping while they could?
In general, the standard reply for the best course of action when there’s civil unrest is bugging in and sheltering in place. Now that is particularly good advice when you have a known, secured location such as your home. A more exposed place like a theatre were rioters can break in any moment may be a different story.

Personally, if I have the chance and I see I have the room to do so, I would get into my vehicle and evacuate unless I gather more intel about the situation that convinces me otherwise.
These people, they easily could have been cornered, make a wrong turn and get pulled out of their vehicle and beaten to death.
In a defendable home, armed, then experience tells us that you are far more exposed and likely to get pulled out of your vehicle and attacked if leave the shelter. 

As for driving during riots and civil unrest. It’s a bad idea to speed and just crash against anyone standing in front of you. I’ve honestly been caught in more riots, crowds and protests than I could possible remember. For years after 2001 it was practically a weekly occurrence for me, maybe even more often than that at times. What I can tell you is that you don’t want to floor the gas pedal, you want to move slowly but surely. Don’t stop, keep moving at slow speed pushing people out of the way and letting those that can, move out of the way themselves. Make no eye contact, stay calm and under no circumstances get off the vehicle, even if people start hitting your car.
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”